The Secret To Getting Fashion Internships!

It is really important to gain experience by interning to help you break into the fashion industry! Paid internships programs, can be competitive and tend to have early recruitment periods during winter to early spring semester. Another alternative is to arrange for a non-paid internship (where you earn college credit).

As with everything in life, getting a fashion internship all about the preparation! Proper preparation, along with your other assets, with set you apart from your competition and will help make hiring you a no-brainer!

If you don’t have any industry contacts, don’t get down in the dumps! It could just be a sign that you need to get out and do some major networking! You can start with college career counselors, professors, and other students while also exploring industry events (fashion shows, open houses, trunk shows, etc.) where you can meet lots of new fashion contacts.

You can also approach creative agencies, designers, stylists, fashion editors, or fashion producers to say you want to learn their craft and are interested in interning. Many of these people will be happy to have someone come in and help lighten their load. Although you may not earn a stipend, you will definitely gain experience and exposure to the industry.

All of these people could possibly have valuable information that can lead to you getting an internship. To find the right fashion internship, make sure you openly discuss your job search with the people you know and ask them to check in with the people they know. Doing so could really help you out big time!

Here are 2 resources that you can use to search for fashion internships:

Free Fashion Internships: Lists fashion internships across the country.
Check out http://www.freefashioninternships.com

Style Careers: This is the largest fashion-only job search website.
Visit: http://www.stylecareers.com

Once you have scored an internship, make sure you build bridges with managers and co-workers while you are working there so you can keep in touch once your job has ended to keep the lines of communication open.

Be Bold, Bright and a Cut Above – Tips to Style Your Way Into Fashion News

Fashion. It’s a competitive game. And if the likes of Vogue’s Anna Wintour are anything to go by, it can be incredibly daunting for those just starting out and doing their own PR.

Yet, the glossy mags are ultimately where we want to be seen.

So how do you get fashion editors to take notice of your label if you’re not the owner of an established brand like Sass and Bide or Ksubi?

Editor of Australia’s Shop Till You Drop magazine, Justine Cullen says “do your research and think creatively”.

And if you’re pitching her a story…?

“Please make sure it’s not [a story] that ran in the magazine the month before, that you clearly haven’t read. Cringe. And target it. Sounds basic but I’m always deleting pitches sent for ‘your food and health pages’. Which we don’t have,” she says.

DIY PR guru, Amanda Fox of Dames and Divas says being eco-friendly, limited edition and one-of-a-kind, handcrafted from vintage silk kimonos helped her shoes stand out and get featured in the media.

“Their bright, bold colours definitely stand out which are reinforced with clean, clear, crisp professional product photography,” said Amanda.

Melbourne based, celebrity stylist Amber Renae agrees saying bold colours, heavy embellishments and a cut no-one has seen before gets a fashion editor’s attention. You also need to be persistent and proactively contact the media.

Producing key editorial pieces that might be a bit crazy to wear, specifically for PR purposes, in addition to your saleable line, also helps, she said.

And if you want to get your clothes to a celebrity – just contact their stylist “9 out of 10 times we’ll look at your look-book and product,” says Amber.

Here are PR Guru’s 10 tips on doing your own fashion PR:

1. Get your timing right – fashion titles work two to six months in advance, so make sure you’re pitching for the right season.

2. Read the magazines you want to get covered in, get to know their content and style and adapt your story pitch to suit them.

3. Look amazing; stand out. This is when attention to detail counts – make your media kit look as professional and beautiful as possible.

4. Tell the story behind your range/label and explain what makes it like no other, include a great press release in your media kit.

5. Check in with the media. Send in samples but don’t forget to follow up with a phone call and your story pitch. Only send releases to one member of staff at the same publication.

6. Gift your wares. Select a small number of celebrities that you think would be best suited to your product. Contact their publicists – look online or you can sometimes go through the publicity department of the media outlet or TV network they work for.

7. Invest in top quality, professional photography – the media may or may not use your images but it’s still important to have the best available photographs to ‘sell’ your product. Include 3 high quality low res JPG’s of your strongest products.

8. Don’t forget the details. Make sure your media kit contains all the retail and pricing information as well as your location, contact details and biography.

9. Love your product, wear it, promote it – take Allanah Hill as an example – she is always promoting her brand.

10. Get on the event scene and be seen. Never underestimate the power of meeting people at events. Plus use social media.

What’s Hot Across The Pond: European Fashion Designers

It seems like Europe is always one step ahead of the United States of America when it comes to fashion design. Whether you know it yet or not, what’s fierce on the runways of Paris and Milan’s fashion weeks have likely not made it over to American runways just yet, and when they do, Europe will likely be on to more cutting-edge trends by then. So what is it that keeps the European fashion market one step ahead of the American market? Among many things, fashion school students speculate that it is the inventive European designers that keep their eyes wide open and their collections fresh and innovative. For those of you in speculation of this phenomenon, here’s a list of European designers who put on 2011 runway shows that awed young fashion lovers, photographers, magazine editors and seasoned fashion veterans alike!

Daughter of Beatle, Paul McCartney, the British-born Stella McCartney has been a successful designer since the nineteen-nineties. Though some speculate that she got an industry advantage because of her ultra-famous father, McCartney has proved herself time and time again to have immense creative vision and talent. After she graduated from fashion college in England, she was quickly appointed chief designer at the Paris fashion house of Chloe. Since then, her designs have been almost unanimously commercially successful. Her most recent collection for Autumn of 2011 plays with a lot of delightful gender ambiguity. McCartney has created loose, yet tailored women’s wear, including collared coats and blazers with a playful sensibility.

British shoe designer Nicholas Kirkwood was raved about after February’s Autumn/Winter 2011 fashion week presentations. Relatively new as fashion industry insider, the designer has practically re-defined what is thought to be possible in shoe-design, with his alienous, decorative collection. Kirkwood’s shoes are usually unthinkably high, and they are often sprouting fur, feathers and beads. Often, they feature wild patterns, layered and diverse fabrics and materials, and always artful and unexpected angles. Kirkwood’s Fall and Winter shoes are truly a fashion delight.

Of Italian and Japanese heritage, Nicola Formichetti is the creative director for the French fashion house, Thierry Mugler, and the chief designer for pop sensation Lady Gaga. Originally an architecture student, Formichetti dropped out of school and became heavily involved in London’s club scene and immersed himself in the world of European street fashion. Eventually, he got himself a job at a fashionable boutique called The Pineal Eye quickly working his way up to art director and head buyer. His talent was soon recognized by fashion editors, which led to work in several high fashion publications, and eventually to his position at Mugler. Formichetti’s designs are often futuristic and hyper-sexual, evocative of the club scene he was once so heavily immersed in.

McCartney, Kirkwood and Formichetti are only three of the countless innovative minds in European fashion design. We look forward to future fashion seasons, and the striking collections that they will surely produce in years to come.